Petroglyphs in the Valley of Fire

Image: iClipart

DAILY JOURNAL ASSIGNMENTS: If you’re missing any of the following journal assignments, please complete them, show them to your teacher, and say, “I still need to be given a grade for this assignment.” (If you don’t tell her that, she may misunderstand which journal assignment you’re showing her.)

Monday, Sept. 8:  A claim is a statement that can be proven or disproved. In “Native American Oral Traditions” (by Joseph Bruchac), what claim is the author making? — Once you’ve finished this journal, be sure to draw a large dividing line between last week’s vocabulary words and this week’s; also DATE the page where you’ll be recording this week’s vocabulary words and their definitions.

Tuesday, Sept. 9: In “The Sky Tree,” a turtle becomes the earth as an explanation of how the earth was “created”. To the Pre-Columbian Native Americans, the earth consisted of the North American continent. Discuss the evidence found in “The Sky Tree” that the Native Americans understood the shape of the North American continent. (Evidence is a series of facts that support a claim.)

Wednesday, Sept. 10: N. Scott Momaday says “The human spirit… endures.” Discuss how this statement and the poem, “The Earth Only” intersect philosophically. In other words, how do Momaday’s beliefs and the poem mirror each other, in terms of philosophy?

Thursday, Sept. 11: Please summarize each of the passages you read in our literature book this week.

DAILY CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES: If you were gone while we read stories from the literature book, the best way to catch up is to check out a book, come in at lunch by appointment, come in after school by appointment, or plan to attend Friday morning’s extra help session to get caught up on your reading.

Monday, Sept. 8:  We started class today by drawing a large dividing line between last week’s vocabulary words and this week’s; also DATE the page where you’ll be recording this week’s vocabulary words and their definitions. After we did that, your teacher read Chief Seattle’s ecology-minded story, Brother Eagle, Sister Sky. She owns this book and will allow you to read it in her classroom at lunch, after school, or during Friday morning extra help time, if you were gone today. After reading Brother Eagle, Sister Sky, we read N. Scott Momaday’s biographical information on page 30 in the literature book.

Tuesday, Sept. 9: Today during class, we read “The Way to Rainy Mountain” on page 32, “Coyote Finishes His Work” on page 22 (if you didn’t read it last week), “The Blackfeet Genesis” on page 24, the biographical information entitled “Alvar Nunez Cabeza de Voca” on page 44, and “La Relacion” on page 46.

Wednesday, Sept. 10: Today we watched a video about how to write a thesis statement on Pre-Columbian literary concepts. (Check out that link to watch the video for yourself!) Then we were given a Thesis Statement Graphic Organizer to fill out in class (if you click those blue words, you can download this handout and print it at home but extra copies are in Box 9). We used our journal notes to create a thesis on whichever works of Pre-Columbian literature you enjoyed most (or you have the most information on).  At the end of the hour, your teacher collected the Thesis Statement Graphic Organizer, so as soon as you get yours done, please turn it in to your teacher and say, “I still need a grade for this.”

Thursday, Sept. 11: We were given a score for this week’s five-or-more vocabulary words. Please show your vocabulary words for this week to your teacher and say, “I still need a grade for these.” Also, our teacher handed back our graded thesis statement graphic organizers. Please ask for yours back, as this will help us create an outline next week. Also, we got to look at a sample outline and essay on the Pre-Columbian vs. Modern/European topic. Extra copies are in Box 10. Here’s a link so you can download one from home if you’d like: Outline on Native Am Lit

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About Chelly Wood

I am a school librarian with an English degree, and I like to write books. My literary agent is Elizabeth Kracht of Kimberley Cameron & Associates.

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