Image of some of the most common proofreading symbols used by editors

This page of proofreading symbols can be found on EnglishEmporium.WordPress.com

DAILY JOURNAL ASSIGNMENTS: 

Monday, March 9: List with numbers or bullets the following proofreading symbols’ names, what the symbols look like, and examples of how it’s used (found on pp 13 and 14 of the English Handbook Pages):

  • comma
  • transpose
  • delete
  • insert

Tuesday, March 10: List with numbers or bullets the following proofreading symbols’ names, what the symbols look like, and examples of how it’s used (found on pp 13 and 14 of the English Handbook Pages):

  • apostrophe
  • hyphen
  • let it stand
  • paragraph

 

Wednesday, March 11: Now that you’ve edited other people’s essays, what have you learned about your own writing? Set three goals for your paper’s revision process. Please number them.

Thursday, March 12: Look back at yesterday’s list of goals. Which ones have you achieved, and which ones still need to be addressed in your paper?

 

DAILY CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES: 

Monday, March 9: Today students did some peer editing of our Native American essays. If you happen to have your essay at home, you may download the PowerPoint called “5 Para Essay Edit” on this page, and use it to guide your self-editing. Then have your parent e-mail your teacher, stating that you completed the editing step using proofreading symbols from the English Handbook Pages, in a second color, on your first draft. (If you’re making up these points after we’ve turned in our Native American literature essays, please use that PowerPoint with an essay or writing assignment from another class. Parents must e-mail your teacher, explaining that you did so.)

Tuesday, March 10: Today students finished up their peer editing of our Native American essays. If you happen to have your essay at home, you may download the PowerPoint called “5 Para Essay Edit” on this page, and use it to guide your self-editing. Then have your parent e-mail your teacher, stating that you completed the editing step using proofreading symbols from the English Handbook Pages, in a second color, on your first draft. (If you’re making up these points after we’ve turned in our Native American literature essays, please use that PowerPoint with an essay or writing assignment from another class. Parents must e-mail your teacher, explaining that you did so.)

Wednesday, March 11: Today we used the laptop computers to begin typing our Native American literature essays. If you were gone today, you may need an extra day to get yours typed. Please be aware, however, that the teacher will not accept these essays after Spring Break.

Thursday, March 12: Today we used the laptop computers to finish typing our Native American literature essays. If you were gone today, you may need an extra day to get yours typed. Please be aware, however, that the teacher will not accept these essays after Spring Break. When you turn your essay in, please staple it in this order:

  • TOP => Six Traits Form (in the big box, in the make-up work center)
  • NEXT => Final Draft of Essay (highlight each vocab word with a highlighter pen, one time each)
  • NEXT => First Draft of Essay (must have 20 or more proofreading symbols, demonstrating edits)
  • NEXT => Outline Page
  • NEXT => Thesis Graphic Organizer (that’s the page with three ovals)
  • BOTTOM => Vocab Pages (highlight each of the words you used in your essay)

Never leave make-up work on your teacher’s desk. Turn it in to her, personally. Thank you.

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About Chelly Wood

I am a school librarian with an English degree, and I like to write books. My literary agent is Elizabeth Kracht of Kimberley Cameron & Associates.

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